Fisheries Economics of the U.S. 2012 and Status of the Stocks 2013

WASHINGTON (Saving Seafood) April 29, 2014 -- Today, NOAA Fisheries released the 2012 edition of its annual economic report on the state of U.S. fisheries, "Fisheries Economics of the U.S. 2012," alongside the 2013 edition of its annual "Status of the Stocks." According to NOAA, the two reports "show strong economic gains from fishing, continued improvement in fish stocks."

However, as many in New England already know, growth and improvement haven't been felt everywhere. Strict catch limits and sector management have contributed to a decline in the region's working waterfronts. NOAA's economic report states, "The key performance indicators of [the Northeast Multispecies Sectors or "Catch Share"] program show that since implementation from 2010 through 2011, total revenue, quota and landings of groundfish decreased while total revenue per active vessel and total revenue per trip increased."

New England's shrinking groundfish fleet is earning more per vessel, but the region is experiencing an overall decline in groundfish landings and revenue. This consolidation is currently being felt throughout the region.

Other highlights of the findings for the "Fisheries Economics of the U.S. 2012" and "Status of U.S. Fisheries 2013" reports related to New England and the Mid-Atlantic are detailed below. Read the full Fisheries Economics of the U.S. 2012 report here Read the full Status of the Stocks 2013 report here Fisheries Economics of the U.S. 2012

Overview

  • Sea scallop ($559 million) followed by shrimp ($490 million), Pacific salmon ($489 million), and American lobster ($429 million) contributed most to total revenue in the U.S.
  • The commercial fishing industry - harvesters, processors and dealers, and wholesalers and retailers - generated $141 billion in sales, $39 billion in income, and supported 1.3 million jobs in 2012 in fishing and across the broader economy.
  • Commercial fishermen in the U.S. harvested 9.6 billion pounds of finfish and shellfish in 2012, earning $5.1 billion for their catch.

New England

  • In 2012, commercial fishermen in New England landed 664 million pounds of finfish and shellfish, earning $1.2 billion in landings revenue.
  • Landings revenue in the New England region totaled $1.2 billion in 2012. This was a 72% increase (a 24% increase in real terms) from 2003 levels ($691 million) and a 8.1% increase (a 8.5% increase in real terms) relative to 2011 ($1.1 billion).
  • In 2012, the New England Region's seafood industry generated $603 million in sales impacts in Connecticut, $1.9 billion in sales impacts in Maine, $8.5 billion in sales impacts in Massachusetts, $609 million in sales impacts in New Hampshire, and $1.2 billion in sales impacts in Rhode Island.
  • Massachusetts generated the largest impacts across three of the impact categories, generating 107,000 jobs, $2.2 billion in income, and $3.4 billion in value added impacts. The smallest income impacts were generated in Connecticut ($128 million) and the smallest employment impacts were also generated in Connecticut (3,900 jobs).

Mid-Atlantic


  • Landings revenue was dominated by sea scallop ($169 million) and blue crab ($100 million).
  • In 2012, commercial fishermen in the Mid-Atlantic region landed 751 million pounds of finfish and shellfish, earning $488 million in landings revenue.
  • In 2012, the Mid-Atlantic region's seafood industry generated 137,477 jobs, $18 billion in sales, $4 billion in income, and $6.5 billion in value added impacts across all five states

Status of the Stocks

Overview

  • Seven stocks were removed from the overfishing list, while six stocks were added.
    • Removed: White hake (Gulf of Maine, Georges Bank); Red Grouper (Southern Atlantic Coast); Black Sea Bass (Southern Atlantic Coast); Gag (Gulf of Mexico); Gray Triggerfish (Gulf of Mexico); Greater Amberjack (Gulf of Mexico); Bering Sea/Aleutian Islands Octopus Complex
    • Added: Thorny Skate (Gulf of Maine); Winter Skate (Georges Bank/ Southern New England); Hogfish (Gulf of Mexico); Blueline Tilefish (South Atlantic); Gulf of Mexico Jacks Complex; Striped Marlin (Western and Central North Pacific)
  • Four stocks were removed from the overfished list, and three were added.
    • Removed: Sacramento River fall Chinook salmon (rebuilt); White Hake (Gulf of Maine/Georges Bank); Red Grouper (Southern Atlantic Coast); Cowcod (Pacific Coast)Added: Pacific Bluefin Tuna (Pacific, PFMC/WPFMC); Striped Marlin (Western and Central North Pacific); Blueline Tilefish (South Atlantic)
    • Added: Pacific Bluefin Tuna (Pacific, PFMC/WPFMC); Striped Marlin (Western and Central North Pacific); Blueline Tilefish (South Atlantic)

New England


  • In 2013, nine New England stocks were on the overfishing list.
    • Atlantic Cod (Georges Bank); Atlantic Cod (Gulf of Maine); Haddock (Gulf of Maine) Windowpane Flounder (Gulf of Maine/Georges Bank); Witch flounder; Yellowtail flounder (Cape Cod/Gulf of Maine); Yellowtail flounder (Georges Bank); Thorny skate (Gulf of Maine); Winter skate (George Bank/Southern New England)
  • In 2013, twelve New England stocks were on the overfished list.
    • Atlantic Cod (Georges Bank), Atlantic Cod (Gulf of Maine); Atlantic Halibut; Atlantic Salmon; Atlantic Wolfish; Ocean Pout; Thorney Skate; Witch Flounder; Windowpane Flounder (Gulf of Maine/Georges Bank); Yellowtail Flounder (Cape Cod/Gulf of Maine); Yellowtail Flounder (Georges Bank); Winter Flounder (Southern New England/Mid-Atlantic)

Mid Atlantic
  • In 2013, zero Mid Atlantic stocks were on the overfishing list.
  • In 2013, zero Mid Atlantic stocks were on the overfished list.

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