Preservation

Black Bile from the North

  • By: Ted Williams
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Foreign interests want to gouge the world’s dirtiest oil from under Canada’s vast boreal forest and pipe it through some of North America’s most important fish and wildlife habitat.

Industry Update

  • By: Kirk Deeter
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Angling Trade Report…On trends in the fly-fishing industry... Time for a brief preview of the new-products front for 2009. Many of the key fly-fishing market players who led with trump in 2008 are now leveraging/expanding product lines into which they’ve poured significant R-and-D

Short Casts

  • By: James Butler
Why Fly Fish

Why Fly Fishing? A new DVD asks, and answers, this very question. By Jim Butler It all started at the Yale Peabody Museum, really. The Peabody was making plans to display a traveling exhibit from the American Museum of Fly Fishing (AMFF), called "Seeing Wonders: The Nature of Fly Fishing."

Check, Clean & Dry: the Fight Against Aquatic Invaders

BOZEMAN, Montana's trout season begins to hit its stride, Simms Fishing Products ( www.simmsfishing.com ) is reminding anglers to be aware of their critical role in the fight against the spread of aquatic nuisance species. Many of the county's outstanding recreational fisheries

Whirling Disease Foundation and TU Merge

Trout Unlimited (TU) and the Whirling Disease Foundation (WDF) announced plans to formally merge the two organizations in an effort to combat the growing problem of aquatic nuisance species and their effect on the nation's trout and salmon.

Stopping Didymo

Stop Didymo!

Learn what you need to know to stop the spread of didymo.

Short Casts

FR amp R Fly Fishing Film Tour

We're pleased to announce that Kirk Hall of Evanston, Wyoming, is the winner of the 2007 Fly-Fishing Film Festival

Putting It All Together

  • By: Paul Guernsey
  • and Buzz Bryson

Assembling a rod; what is 'modulus' anyway; and booting up

Getting to Know Didymo

Didymosphenia geminata is a microscopic alga currently causing headaches for biologists and anglers in two hemispheres. Often called "rock snot" for its slimy appearance and gooey consistency, didymo is an emerging problem that could have bad effects on trout rivers in both North America and New Zealand.