Don't Let the Snow Blow You Away

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5 Tips for Staying Warm on the Water During Winter

There’s nothing worse than knowing that fish are rising to Baetis or midges, or whatever else might hatch during winter, and there’s nothing you can do about it. Why? Because you’re freezing your gluts right off, not to mention that your fingers don’t work, your feet feel like wood planks, and you can’t even speak because your lips are nearly frozen shut. So you sit in the truck, watch those fish, and wonder how that dude who’s out there railing them can stand the cold.

New Sales Methods, New Markets

  • By: Kirk Deeter
Angling Trade fade

We’re hearing a lot about the new products fly companies will unveil in 2012 (and rest assured, FR&R and Angling Trade will detail the hot newcomers before they even hit the racks of your favorite fly shop). Here are a few hints: Patagonia is coming out with a wading boot that uses mountaineering technology to dramatically improve traction. Sage shelved its Z-Axis in favor of a rod line called “One”; by early accounts, it is indeed something special. Orvis, Hardy and others are introducing new products across wide price ranges that should have consumers chomping at the bit to try (and buy). Overall, I expect 2012 to be a solid new product year—one of the best in a decade.

What would Halloween be without bats?


Help stop the bat-killing White Nose Syndrome.

These flying mammals are as much a part of Halloween as jack-o-lanterns and trick-or-treating. But some parts of the United States have almost no bats left – they’ve been killed by an epidemic called White-nose Syndrome (WNS). Please keep the bats in Halloween by helping stop this disease. Tell the White House to fund the fight against WNS. WNS spreads farther each year, with dire consequences for North American bats. Scientists are predicting regional extinctions of the little brown bat in the northeastern United States by 2026 because of this lethal disease. Critical hibernation sites of endangered Indiana, gray, and Virginia big-eared bats are at risk. Twenty-five of the United States’ 47 bats species hibernate in caves and mines and could be affected by WNS.

Cape Cod Stripers

  • By: Rob Conery
  • Photography by: Bob Mahoney

You can hear it as soon as you step on the Centerville property. It gets louder as you walk down the grassy path, past the flats skiff and the old Bahamian smuggling vessel up on stands. From the open barn door near a small pine grove, in the humming, electric air, an urgent buzzing pops. Inside, from the rafters hang fly rods, surfboards and yacht club burgees.