Roy's Biot Emergers

Roy's Biot Emergers

Roy Palm probably knows Colorado's Frying Pan River better than any other living person. He has fished it, guided it, and in fact lived just a few

  • By: A. K. Best
Roy Palm probably knows Colorado's Frying Pan River better than any other living person. He has fished it, guided it, and in fact lived just a few yards from it for more than 20 years. He knows all too well how finicky the large trout can get during the numerous hatches that occur there on a daily basis.

Of those many hatches, Blue-Wing Olives, PMDs and a variety of midges seem to be the mainstay for most of the year. Many of the standard dubbed-body and quill-body dry flies are very productive. But, as most of you already know, there are days when the standard stuff just doesn't cut it. That's the time to dig out a special box of flies called Roy's Biot Emergers.

The unique thing about these flies is that you can imitate almost any emerging mayfly by simply varying the body color and hook size. They can be fished on the surface as an emerger, spinner or cripple, or anywhere in the water column to imitate a nymph or rising emerger.

Recipe:
Hook: Mustad 79580 (or equivalent) size 16, 18, 20, 22
Thread: Danville's 6/0, color to match body
Body: Dyed wild turkey or wild goose biot. Black, dun, olive, cream and tan will cover most of your needs.
Thorax: Small ball of medium-gray rabbit fur.
Hackle: Two turns of medium-dun hen hackle.1. Place the hook in the vise, attach the tying thread about two hook-eye spaces behind the eye, wind to the end of the shank and clip off the tag.

2. Tie on a biot by its tip with the notch facing the hook eye.

3. Wind the biot forward to create a segmented appearance, to a point that is about three hook-eye spaces behind the eye. Tie down, clip off butt and dub a small round thorax.

4. Select a medium-dun hen hackle whose fibers extend only as far as the hook point. This is about the same hackle length you would use for a dry fly of the same hook size. (Hackle fiber length equals 1.5 times hook-gap space.)

5. Pull or trim away the soft fuzz from the base of the feather, trim the butt to allow for tie down, and tie the butt to the top of the hook with the shiny side facing the hook eye.

6. Take two turns of hackle forward, tie the feather tip off on top of the hook, whip finish, and apply a tiny drop of head lacquer to the thread wraps only.